Book

Cystic Fibrosis patients turn to experimental phage therapy

Frank Buckley interviews author and publicist Diane Shader Smith, who’s daughter, Mallory, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis and authored the posthumously published book “Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.”


Panel decries lack of attention for Antimicrobial Resistance

Frank Buckley interviews author and publicist Diane Shader Smith, who’s daughter, Mallory, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis and authored the posthumously published book “Salt in My Soul: An Unfinished Life.”


The impact of antibiotic resistance: sharing stories to advance needed legislation

The compelling story of Mallory Smith, who lived with cystic fibrosis for 25 years and died in 2017 after a 10-year battle with antibiotic-resistant infections, set the stage for a discussion on Capitol Hill on May 18 about the growing impact of resistance, the broken economic model for antibiotic development, the need to use antibiotics wisely and how legislation like the PASTEUR Act can help.


Diane Shader Smith shares lessons from her daughter Mallory's unfinished life

“If medicine is in the business of improving our health–human health, we ought to know what makes us humans,” says Dien Ho, PhD, associate professor of Philosophy and Healthcare Ethics. He’s speaking about the MCPHS Center for Health Humanities’ ongoing series of lectures delivered by artists and writers exploring the patient condition.


Book review: Salt In My Soul

Salt in My Soul is not an easy book. Like every story of a life authentically lived, it is an alternation of joy and sorrow, expectation, and despair. It is, to borrow the title of another bestseller of years past, a book about the audacity of hope. How can one hope in the face of an inevitably terminal illness?


Book Review: Salt In My Soul

A month or two ago, I finished a powerful memoir that had been on my to-be-read list before it even came out.

But it was a read I needed to sit with. As much as it shook me to my core—tears during the last several chapters included—I couldn’t just run to my computer and type up a review for the blog. Part of that was due to the nature of the subject in general, of course…but so much of it had to do with my own complicated feelings about living with a life-threatening chronic illness.


My daughter is gone but her legacy lives through her writing and phage therapy

“Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?”

That line from the musical “Hamilton” inspires me to keep telling the story of my daughter Mallory. She died two years ago Friday at the age of 25, two months after receiving a transplant to replace both of her lungs, which had been ravaged by cystic fibrosis and an infection that no drugs could eradicate.